Netanyahu speech to U.S. Congress exposes bitter divisions

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks before a joint meeting of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 3, 2015. In a speech that stirred political intrigue in two countries, Netanyahu told Congress that negotiations underway between Iran and the U.S. would "all but guarantee" that Tehran will get nuclear weapons, a step that the world must avoid at all costs. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)Tthe optics of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech on Tuesday were just as important as the speech itself.



Officials: US report finds racial bias in Ferguson police

FILE - In this Nov. 25, 2014 file photo, police officers watch protesters as smoke fills the streets in Ferguson, Mo. after a grand jury's decision in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown. A Justice Department investigation has found patterns of racial bias in the Ferguson police department and at the municipal jail and court. The full report, to be publicly released on March 4, says the investigation found Ferguson officers disproportionately used excessive force against blacks and too often charged them with petty offenses. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — A Justice Department investigation found sweeping patterns of racial bias within the Ferguson, Missouri, police department, with officers routinely discriminating against blacks by using excessive force, issuing petty citations and making baseless traffic stops, according to law enforcement officials familiar with its findings.



Congress sends Homeland bill to Obama without conditions

House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio returns to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 3, 2015, as the House votes on funding for the Homeland Security Department without provisions attached to counter President Barack Obama's executive actions on immigration. Despite holding the majority in the Senate and the House, Republicans were unable to overcome united opposition from Senate Democrats to the GOP strategy of trying to overturn Obama's immigration plan by linking them to funding for Homeland. They also suffered embarrassing internal divisions that left the country within hours of a partial agency shutdown last week. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)WASHINGTON (AP) — Bitterly admitting defeat, the Republican-controlled Congress sent legislation to President Barack Obama on Tuesday that funds the Department of Homeland Security without any of the immigration-related concessions they demanded for months.



How Petraeus was trapped by a lie

David Petraeus learned the hard way the truth of an old Washington adage: It’s not the crime, it’s the cover-up that will bring you down.
UN moves to slap sanctions on South Sudan

South Sudan's President Salva Kiir (L) walks prior to a meeting on March 3, 2015 in Addis Ababa, as part of the latest round of peace talks to end over 14 months of conflictThe UN Security Council on Tuesday unanimously adopted a resolution to slap sanctions on South Sudan's warring factions, ratcheting up pressure as a deadline loomed to reach a peace deal. Drafted by the United States, the resolution sets up a sanctions committee which would submit to the council the names of those responsible for blocking peace efforts, and who should be punished with a global travel ban and assets freeze. Regional mediators have given South Sudan's President Salva Kiir and rebel chief Riek Machar until Thursday to reach a final deal to end 14 months of war that have killed tens of thousands of people.





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